BACQUE OTHER LOSSES PDF

Bacque revealed that as a result of the policies of the Western Allies, some 1, This important work has remained in print through many editions. Over , copies have been sold in eleven countries. Displayed are the covers for some of the foreign editions. Autographed by the author. Free shipping within North America.

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James Bacque. Vancouver: Talonbooks, In fact, most of the new material does not bear on the original questions he raised but instead consists of information that he found in documents he researched in the Soviet Archives.

These Soviet reports, supplemented by personal testimonies from German veterans who survived, make it clear that the camps were indeed horrid variants of the gulag. The Soviet documents do not, however, produce a causal link between the Soviets and the charges that Bacque has stated previously about the American mistreatment of prisoners.

The remainder of the new material is primarily information he received in letters from and interviews with former American soldiers, concerning abuses they witnessed in the postwar American camps. Prisoners were beaten and neglected, an indeterminate number were killed by angry guards. Food supplies and medical care were inadequate in numbers of camps, Red Cross aid was frequently directed to civilians rather than the German soldiers, and American soldiers were often indifferent to the sufferings of the Germans.

But were these outrages the result of the chaotic conditions following the war, or were they part of deliberate policy orchestrated by General Eisenhower, as Bacque alleges? And if deliberate then where did the policy originate?

This recent edition adds little new to this part of the controversy. The new testimony added by former soldiers speaks to individual incidents they witnessed or to protests that they made and believed went unheeded. They doubted his contention that Eisenhower nursed a personal abiding hatred of the Germans, or that he dared to ignore orders from President Harry S.

Truman and his military superiors, and not only continued to orchestrate atrocities but also persuaded all of those who had to know the details to keep quiet and hide the evidence. Subsequent biographies of Eisenhower and books on the occupation have dismissed these charges as unsupported by any cohesive body of evidence.

In all, nine scholars who contributed to this conference delivered a hefty judgment that Bacque had made charges that the evidence does not sustain. Army, the U. Those who enjoy a good brouhaha may enjoy this, but since the basic text of the book remains the same as that of the publication, none of this sheds any substantial, additional light on the historical events in question.

What then should military historians make of this new edition? The material on the Soviet treatment of German prisoners is interesting, but does not change anything in the ongoing controversy.

Second, each scholar and any general reader with a strong interest in the American role in the postwar occupation of Germany should read the book very carefully. The sections concerning the charges that Eisenhower directed a conspiratorial campaign of mass murder exceed the evidence Bacque offers and the rhetoric extends to sensationalism.

But there are also sections concerning mismanagement in the camps and acts of abuse by some guards that are backed by very compelling evidence. In this area, Bacque has influenced reinterpretations of this era.

Like other books, the strengths of this one can be used with care while the weaknesses can be ignored. Finally, the personal invective, on both sides, adds nothing to the main issue under examination--namely, what can historians learn from the Allied occupation of Germany?

These subjects go beyond American military conduct and are properly the purview of specialists in French and German history. Kevin M. Bacque is now in his eighties. Citation: Terry Shoptaugh. H-War, H-Net Reviews. February, Notes [1]. Stafford, review of Other Losses , Add a Comment. Michigan State University Department of History.

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Ike and the Disappearing Atrocities

Seldom has the publication of a historical monograph on a subject ordinarily of interest only to a few specialists -- the treatment of prisoners of war -- received so much attention or excited so much anger as James Bacque's "Other Losses. The Canadian book, I should say immediately, carries a jacket blurb from me that was taken out of context and used without permission. It has been discussed on American television, in Time magazine and in many other news media outlets. In its German edition, it was a runaway best seller. Prima Publishing of California intends to publish the book in May, which could fan the flames in the United States.

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Other Losses

General Dwight D. Eisenhower intentionally caused the deaths by starvation or exposure of around a million German prisoners of war held in Western internment camps briefly after the Second World War. Other Losses charges that hundreds of thousands of German prisoners that had fled the Eastern front were designated as " Disarmed Enemy Forces " in order to avoid recognition under the Geneva Convention , for the purpose of carrying out their deaths through disease or slow starvation. Other Losses cites documents in the U. National Archives and interviews with people who stated they witnessed the events.

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James Bacque. Vancouver: Talonbooks, In fact, most of the new material does not bear on the original questions he raised but instead consists of information that he found in documents he researched in the Soviet Archives. These Soviet reports, supplemented by personal testimonies from German veterans who survived, make it clear that the camps were indeed horrid variants of the gulag. The Soviet documents do not, however, produce a causal link between the Soviets and the charges that Bacque has stated previously about the American mistreatment of prisoners. The remainder of the new material is primarily information he received in letters from and interviews with former American soldiers, concerning abuses they witnessed in the postwar American camps. Prisoners were beaten and neglected, an indeterminate number were killed by angry guards.

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