LUIS VALDEZ ZOOT SUIT PDF

It was Father fished, mother made tortillas. So Luis climbed onto the big yellow bus with his fish taco lunch in a paper bag that his mother told him to bring back. He panicked. It was his big moment. Three days before the play, however, he came home to find the family packing.

Author:Faugor Zologis
Country:Gabon
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Love
Published (Last):23 January 2009
Pages:210
PDF File Size:19.44 Mb
ePub File Size:10.59 Mb
ISBN:651-8-90784-664-1
Downloads:12271
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Mezragore



Much of the cast had scant acting experience. The story itself was a Brechtian take on a relatively obscure unsolved murder in Los Angeles; its climax involved a humiliating assault on a Latino man by racist United States servicemen. Just a decade earlier, its writer and director, Luis Valdez, was creating short skits for audiences of striking farmworkers in the fields of the Central Valley in California. But audiences kept coming, and coming, selling out show after packed show.

Fans came one week and returned with their families the next; Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead is said to have seen the play 22 times. Valdez then directed a feature-film version , which was released in On Tuesday, Jan. The infamous Zoot Suit riots, a series of racially motivated attacks against Mexican-American youths in the summer of , figures in as well.

The show is both a homecoming and a reunion. Four decades after its world premiere, Mr. Valdez, who is 76, is back as director. In the intervening years, Latino playwrights, from Cherrie Moraga to Luis Alfaro, have made their mark on American theater. On a recent morning, the cast rehearsed a scene set in a Los Angeles dance hall. Several men wore high-waisted trousers, long watch chains dangling from their belts; the women sported T-shirts, tights and sneakers.

The men were strutting, the women spinning, but when a rival gang arrived, colorful curses flew, then fists, and before you knew it, the switchblades were out. Bichir, who is Mexican, is an American Civil Liberties Union celebrity ambassador for immigration rights. For Luis Valdez, mixing the political and the theatrical is nothing new.

The group staged pro-union skits, which he wrote and directed, in halls and on the backs of flatbed trucks. In , Mr. Valdez met with Gordon Davidson, who was the director of the Taper then, about creating something for its New Theater for Now series. He arrived clutching a pamphlet about the Sleepy Lagoon murder that he had gotten years earlier from David Sanchez, the founder of the pro-Chicano organization the Brown Berets.

Valdez said. Valdez laughed. A good riot. An artistic riot. Univision and Hoy sponsored a party at the theater to celebrate the first day of ticket sales, complete with zoot-suited dancers and live swing music.

The nationwide call drew actors for 25 parts, and most cast members have backgrounds in film and TV. Though the play was written in and set in , Mr. Valdez feels its story is timeless, its themes part of an ever-repeating historical cycle. At a table reading between dance rehearsals, Mr.

Bichir and Tom G. McMahon had questions for Mr. Valdez about how to tackle their roles as El Pachuco and the Press. The challenge, Mr. Valdez said, is finding the human in the trickster spirit. The play presents lots of similar challenges for audiences. The lengths are longer. Home Page World U.

CONTRACT KAMERVERHUUR PDF

'Zoot Suit' still relevant four decades later

Scroll down for dates and ticketing information. Now, in , Valdez has created a new version of the play which opened in March at the Taper Forum to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Center Theatre Group. The revival was held over three times due to demand. UC Santa Cruz will be the first academic theater in the world to produce this new script. Join UC Santa Cruz in celebrating the life and work of Luis Valdez, one of the most important playwrights of modern history, with this theatrical event. Reserved seating.

CISCO 2901 DATASHEET PDF

‘Zoot Suit’: How Latino theater born in the farm fields changed L.A. theater forever

Much of the cast had scant acting experience. The story itself was a Brechtian take on a relatively obscure unsolved murder in Los Angeles; its climax involved a humiliating assault on a Latino man by racist United States servicemen. Just a decade earlier, its writer and director, Luis Valdez, was creating short skits for audiences of striking farmworkers in the fields of the Central Valley in California. But audiences kept coming, and coming, selling out show after packed show. Fans came one week and returned with their families the next; Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead is said to have seen the play 22 times.

Related Articles